The Eternal

Posted by on 01 Sep 2008 at 23:32 in Music

♫ Joy Division – Twenty Four Hours ♫

I’m addicted to Joy Division. Again. Melody, lyrics, rhythm… everything makes sense. Ian Curtis was a great poet. A new movie has been released about the band, the documentary Joy Division. Grant Gee’s movie is a complement to Anton Corbijn’s Control. The documentary contains interviews and concert footage. It’s not just a portrayal of the band but of the music scene it erupted from. Highly recommend it.

Posthumous Woman

Posted by on 26 Aug 2008 at 00:08 in Art, People

♫ The Mary Onettes – The Laughter ♫

If Nietzsche is the posthumous man, Lou Salome surely is the posthumous woman. Friend, pupil, lover, muse and an inspiration to many geniuses of her time, like Nietzsche, Paul Rée, Rilke, Wagner and Freud. She wrote books, poems and dedicated Escreveu livros, poemas e devoted her life to psychoanalysis. It was. Lou was the one whom Freud trusted the treatment of his own daughter. Here is one of her poems, which Nietzsche put to music: Hymn To Life.
Surely, a friend loves a friend the way
That I love you, enigmatic life —
Whether I rejoiced or wept with you,
Whether you gave me joy or pain.

I love you with all your harms;
And if you must destroy me,
I wrest myself from your arms,
As a friend tears himself away from a friend’s breast.

I embrace you with all my strength!
Let all your flames ignite me,
Let me in the ardor of the struggle
Probe your enigma ever deeper.

To live and think millennia!
Enclose me now in both your arms:
If you have no more joy to give me —
Well then—there still remains your pain.

Swedish Sounds

Posted by on 22 Aug 2008 at 13:06 in Music
If you are anything like me, you will love The Mary Onettes. These swedes make tunes in the likes of The Cure, The Smiths, Joy Division e with an 80’s feeling. After hearing one of their songs on Grey’s Anatomy and got the whole album and haven’t stopped listening to it. Last week I ordered the CD and the EP from their label: Labrador. I highly recommend it.

Review: Stardust

Posted by on 14 Oct 2007 at 22:16 in Movies

♫ Celtic Frost – Drown in Ashes

Stardust is Matthew Vaughn’s new movie, based on Neil Gaiman’s book. The movie is beautiful! It’s a fantasy movie, almost like a fairy tale. The movie doesn’t pretend to be something it’s not, a “no BS” movie. You know who the bad guys, you know who the good guys are; but it doesn’t matter. What matters is how the story is told. The whole cast does a good good, but Robert De Niro steals the spotlight. And new comer Charlie Cox is very charming.

Lord of the Rings

Posted by on 04 Mar 2004 at 04:37 in Movies

Aragorn's Coronation by Anke Eissmann

A conversation I heard the other day in line at the bank: “… cinematography, editing, direction… that we could never win but we should have won best adapted screenplay. After all, City of God is the true story, it all happened in real life, not that shit Lord of the Rings, which is all lies”.

Adapted screenplay is not a matter of being based on a true or not, but the quality of the adaptation. And I think Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King deserved all the awards it won.

Boromir's Funeral by Anke Eissmann

I finished reading the book, more of less a month ago. The book is fantastic and much richer than the movie (as almost all adaptations made ​​for cinema). It contains more characters and complexities. It’s exciting, thrilling and sad. It’s another world and once you dive into this world you won’t want to return.

Éowyn and Faramir by Anke Eissmann

Peter Jackson did a great job and should be congratulated. Of course there are things missing in the films… one example is the story between Éowyn and Faramir (which is one of the best characters in the book. Anyway… as I do not want to say goodbye so early to Tolkien’s universe I am now reading the Silmarillion.

all illustrations by Anke Eissmann

 

Oscar 2004

Posted by on 29 Feb 2004 at 23:32 in Movies

the march of the king

The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King

Tonight is Oscar night and I’ll be watching. I know it’s bullshit, that there’s a lot of politics… but I like it. I’m rooting for Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. Not only did I love the movie, it is a way to honor the entire trilogy. The category editing is the only one where I have another favorite: City of God.

Keisha Castle-Hughes in The Whale Rider Charlize Theron in Monster

best actress

Is hard to talk about many categories, most of the nominated films have not been released yet here in Brazil such as Monster, for which Charlize Theron is nominated as best actress (and according to many will take home the prize). She has won several awards for this role, including the Golden Globe and a Silver Berlin Bear. Keisha Castle-Hughes is the youngest actress to be nominated in the history of the Academy Awards. She ‘s cute and her performance moved me but I don’t know if she has chances of winning. Samantha Morton is good actress but did not impress me much in In America. Naomi Watts is always very good and has strong chances of winning.

Sean Penn in Mystic River Bill Murray in Lost in Translation

best actor

For best actor my bet is Sean Penn, who was nominated for his role in Mystic River, but also shined in 21 grams. Bill Murray is also in the running for his performance in Lost In Translation. Jude Law is just a pretty face in Cold Mountain. Unfortunately I haven’t had the chance of seeing Johnny Depp and Ben Kingsley’s performances.

Renee Zellweger in Cold Mountain Ken Watanabe in The Last Samurai

supporting actor & actress

Cold Mountain is a boring movie. It’s not but to square, very pretty… Nicole Kidman’s face as defenseless maiden was a bit too much. The best of the movie is, undoubtedly, Renée Zellweger (who’s favorite to win best supporting actress). My favorite is Patricia Clarkson in Pieces of April. Marcia Gay Harden for Mystic River: blergh! Actually, favorite in the race for best supporting actor, Tim Robbins, for the same movie: also also blergh! I’m rooting for Ken Watanabe for The Last Samurai; he is the soul of the movie. Benicio Del Toro was also amazing in 21 grams. Djimon Hounsou is good actor, but I prefer his role in Amistad than in the movie for which he is nominated, In America.

City of God

Well… may the best man/woman win. Although we all know this sentence can not be applied to the Oscars, who often prefer the cute (Gwyneth Paltrow), media darlings (Julia Roberts) and the politically correct (Denzel Washington & Halle Berry).

Review: The Last Samurai

Posted by on 13 Feb 2004 at 23:53 in Movies

The Last Samurai

Forget Tom Cruise, the star of the movie is Japanese actor Ken Watanabe. Cruise is the worst part of the film. Any other actor would have been better, but since Tom Cruise is also the producer of the film the choice was obvious. The cinematography and art direction are excellent. The  soundtrack by Hans Zimmer is also good. In a samurai film it would be natural for the battle scenes to be spectacular… they are not . After Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King everything seems like a kid’s play but the movie is just about the battles. Sad and slow paced, with exception of the final minutes and an unnecessary romance, The Last Samurai is a very good movie.

story & Oscar

The Last Samurai Katsumoto

Cruise is Nathan Algren, an American captain hired by the Japanese to coach the emperor’s army against a rebellion the samurai. On the first battle the samurai are victorious and take Algren prisoner. He ends up learning and admiring the way of life of the samurai and becomes a student and friend of Katsumoto (portrayed by Watanabe). It is strange to see the Japan pictured here and then see the modern Japan portrayed by Sofia Coppola’s Lost in Translation. Edward Zwick’s film is nominated for the Academy Awards in 4 categories: supporting actor (Ken Watanabe), art direction, sound mixing and wardrobe.

photo credit: 2003 Warner Bros. Ent.

La Nuit Américaine

Posted by on 09 Dec 2003 at 19:31 in Movies

La Nuit Américaine

A true declaration of love for cinema. A film about a film production. If you’ve ever wondered what a movie set is like, watch François Truffaut’s La Nuit Américaine. It is perfect depiction: the confusion, the rush, the bonds that are created, the problems… everything for the sake of the film. Truffaut, who also plays the director, pays homage to great masters of cinema such as Godard, Hitchcock, Buñuel and Orson Welles, among others.

Review: Spider-Man

Posted by on 10 May 2003 at 00:00 in Movies

Tobey Maguire as Spider-Man

It’s not bad, it’s terrible. It is very cliché with bad special effects and William Dafoe in a ridiculous role. Everything that is good about X-Men 2, is bad in Spiderman. The film seems like a childish daytime TV movie. I’m not a fan of Comics but I’d definitely prefer reading them than having to watch this crap. Waste of good actors, wate of money…